The Danger of Caffeinated Alcohol Drinks

The Danger of Caffeinated Alcohol Drinks

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) put out a warning years ago about the harms associated with mixing alcohol and caffeine.  That did not stop beverage giants for producing caffeinated alcohol beverages such as Four Loko which combined the two and was briefly marketed in the United States.  College students and young professionals alike were already mixing energy drinks with vodka and other liquors, so companies began to mass produce the combination marketing it to college-aged students or in some cases an even younger age group. In 2010, the FDA stepped in and said that energy drinks with alcohol could no longer be sold in their current form.  So why would the FDA take such as drastic step to remove a product from the shelves?  Caffeine mixed with alcohol can have detrimental effects such as “making drinkers feel more alert than they would otherwise.”  This means that when combined, alcohol...

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Alcohol Withdrawal Timeline

Alcohol Withdrawal Timeline

Alcohol withdrawal can have a serious impact on your overall health.  Those who have become dependent on alcohol or suffer from Alcohol Use Disorder may experience a number of adverse health conditions as a result of suddenly stopping drinking.  Alcohol withdrawal can affect your mental and physical health.  If you believe that you are addicted to alcohol or have become dependent on drinking, you should always seek medical treatment. Mild Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms Alcohol withdrawal symptoms can range from mild to severe depending on the person and the amount that they drink.  Within 6 hours of quitting drinking people may experience nausea and vomiting, headaches, and insomnia.  Others who have quit drinking may find that they feel irritable or have shaky hands in the immediate hours after they stop.  While these symptoms may not feel severe, they can lead to more serious, long-term complications. Moderate to Severe Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms...

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Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)

A Look at the Impact of Drinking Alcohol While Pregnant According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIH), 20 – 30 percent of women drink during pregnancy.  Researchers agree that no amount of alcohol at any stage during pregnancy is safe.  The developing fetus can be negatively impacted by alcohol particularly in early development.  Heavy drinking or binge drinking may greatly increase the health risks to the fetus. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) occurs when alcohol passes from a mother to her unborn fetus through the mother’s bloodstream.  FASD can impact nearly every aspect of a child’s life causing significant medical problems, depression, anxiety and behavioral problems.  A fetus exposed to alcohol may also increase the likelihood that a child will suffer from substance abuse later in life. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is one of the most common forms of FASD.  Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is known to...

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Alcohol Research Group: National Alcohol Survey

Alcohol Research Group: National Alcohol Survey

For over sixty years the Alcohol Research Group has conducted National Alcohol Surveys.  The surveys look at a number of issues including: The Percentage of Respondents who Have Experienced Harms from Others’ Drinking.  This important research gives insight into alcohol use patterns and problems associated with alcohol use. The survey also provided an update on US Drinking Norms including the average number of drinks that an American drinks over a 12 month period.  The survey found that 28% of men and 38% of women abstained completely from alcohol while 84% of men and 93% of women stated that they consumed 10 drinks or less per week. Alcohol affects every person differently.  While some people are able to drink moderately, others may have the inability to consume any amount of alcohol.  The National Alcohol Survey and United States Drinking Norms provides a guide.  It is not determinate of how much an...

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Alcohol-Attributable Deaths in California

Alcohol-Attributable Deaths in California

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a study on alcohol-attributable deaths due to excessive alcohol use in the United States.  The Alcohol and Public Health: Alcohol-Related Disease Impact looked at alcohol-related deaths over a four-year period (2006-2010).  According to the study, over 10,000 lives were lost to alcohol-related causes.  The majority (around 70%) of lives lost were males between the ages of 50 – 64. The study was broken down into those who succumbed to chronic alcohol-related causes and those who died from acute causes.  Of the 10,694 lives lost because of the harmful effects of alcohol, just over half died from chronic causes.  The most common cause of death for both men and women was alcoholic liver disease followed by alcohol dependence syndrome for men and unspecified liver cirrhosis for women. Tragically, 385 people under the age of 19 were killed in alcohol-attributable deaths during that same...

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